The 4 keys to health

The 4 keys to health is all about investing in the healthiest happiest future you could wish for with sound scientific knowledge and big spoonfuls of commonsense and experience.Tonights blog is for nutrition week. The traffic lights approach to healthfor the 4 keys to health gives one point for every yes answer.
0 – 3: RED.
3 – 6: AMBER.
6 – 9: GREEN.
Scores: Now count up your scores – are you red, amber, or green for this key?
Initial score:
Once you’ve read the chapter and implemented any changes, take the
questionnaire again to see how much you’ve improved.This questionnaire is in 4 parts.
Diet and Blood Sugar Levels
• Is your weight good for your age and height?
• Do you have lots of energy and do you like to exercise?
• Are you free from joint pain?
• Do you rarely feel like dozing in the day and feel alert after eating?
• Do you hardly ever get stomach ache or bloating?
• Do you concentrate easily with a clear memory and few
headaches?
• Do you hardly ever need sweet food or caffeine fixes?
• Do you jump out of bed, raring to go?
• Do you rarely feel dizzy / irritable / have mood swings in
gaps between meals?
Water
• Do you rarely have thirst / dry mouth?
• Do you rarely get headaches?
• Is your urine a mild (not dark) yellow colour?
• Are your skin and lips moist, not dry?
• Do you have regular bowel movements most days?
• Do you have less than two glasses of alcohol a day?
• Do you have five helpings of fresh fruit and vegetables a day?
• Do you have several glasses of fruit water / juice / herbal
teas a day, even if resting?
• Do you avoid having too many salty snacks?
Healthy Low Homocysteine Levels (repairing DNA
and building nerves / cartilage)
• Is your weight satisfactory and stable?
• Are you a clear thinker with a good memory and rare
headaches?
• Do you eat healthily with green veggies, seeds, and nuts,
but aren’t vegan?
• You are not an alcoholic, smoker, or heavy coffee drinker?
• Do you have little joint pain?
• Do you have great stamina without weariness?
• Is your cardiovascular system and blood pressure normal?
• Do you sleep well?
• Are you rarely angry, irritable, or down?
Essential Fats
• Do you have healthy hair?
• Do you have flexible, pain-free joints?
• You are not taking painkillers?
• No arthritis, asthma, or eczema?
• No diagnosed cardiovascular problems?
• Do you spend more than thirty minutes a day outside in
sunlight?
• Do you eat healthily with oily fish, about four eggs a week,
seeds and nuts most days, and fewer than two alcoholic
drinks a day?
• Do you have a good memory, learning abilities, and
concentration?
• You don’t get down, anxious or unnecessarily angry?
Anti-Ageing, Anti-rot, Antioxidants
• Are you a quick healer?
• Are you younger than middle aged (40)?
• Do you have healthy skin?
• No diagnosis of cancer or cardiovascular disease?
• Don’t bruise easily?
• Do you live in quiet, clear air, healthy countryside, not
near major roads?
• Do you eat healthily with five lots of fruit and veg a day,
raw seeds / nuts, and at least two oily fish a week?
• Do you take antioxidant supplements?
• Do you exercise and raise your heart rate five times a
week?If you got a red key read my blogs or get a copy of my book,through www.thepainkiller.co.uk,www.painreliefclinic.co.uk, or amazon.

Exercise is vital for healthy aging

Exercise is vital for healthy ageing, so get out of that chair! When we slouch
in our chairs, we don’t breathe correctly, we have less lung capacity, less
oxygen, a poorer blood flow, a weaker heart, and less nutrient delivery.
Smooth muscles tighten up to take up the slack, and our blood pressure
readings go up. Blood flow can’t accommodate sudden movements anymore,
so dizziness follows, and with it, increased accidents. Men’s sexual potency
falls, the gut slows, and digestion fails. Sugar metabolism struggles andcc
diabetes is more likely to take hold. In an article in Psychological Medicine,
Dregan and M.C Gulliford wrote about how intense exercise helps brain
function (Dregan & Gulliford, 2013), so you can remember where you put
your gym wear! Get my drift?
Here are some more facts I sourced for you to back up reasons to exercise
– for all you academic buffs out there. Whether you are old or young,
‘it’s widely acknowledged that a healthy body equals a healthy mind. The
government recommends a minimum of 150 minutes of exercise per week,
between the ages of 19 and 64’ (Dregan, 2013). A word to the wise – if you
don’t exercise at all, start. If you are new to exercise, start small and just walk
a little further than usual. Exercise doesn’t have to mean enduring lengthy,
intense programmes or taking up a gym membership, although I think the
discipline of going and the social angle is great. If you are exercising on your
own, you still need to add in working out with weights as well as aerobic
exercise, such as walking.
Did you know that at 44 years old, without exercising, we are at the peak
depressive age? However, at 70 – if we follow a fitness programme – it is
possible to be as physically fit and happy as we were when we were 20!
Another study got a group of 60 year olds to start doing three long swims a
week, and their medical measurements and tests were those of 40 year olds.
Exercise is much like medicine – it doesn’t have to taste nice, but the outcome
is more than worth it. Being disciplined about getting your exercise is your
key to longevity, so exercise regularly and effectively. Most people will say
they don’t like it, that it’s boring or painful, that they have no time to do it,
but they’re just in denial for the need to move. Well, couch potatoes, here
are some more facts for you:
• A study looked at 50 elderly people of an average age of 87.
Given a 10 week weights workout at this age, they doubled their muscle

Your Mindset, Your Body

We have previously touched upon the significance of mindset in health. For example we all know that when we feel a bit down, everything feels that much harder to do and yet when we feel really good, it all seems so much easier.

Even though we all know this and have experienced this, it is sometimes difficult to take the next step and realise that by controlling your mindset you can control your ability to achieve, or not achieve your goals. Understandably, you may never have made this link. So, how can you control your mindset, you may ask?

Well, let’s start by looking at what words we use. After witnessing a car accident, if you were asked “did you see lots of glass after the window was smashed?”, would you be more likely to say yes, than if you were asked “did you see lots of glass after the window was broken?”. Absolutely. Tests have proven exactly this. Why? Because smashed evokes a stronger emotion than broken and alters the perception of what happened in reality.

Another example. We all get into situations where somebody lets us down or cheats us. What words you use will affect how you feel. Imagine saying to yourself  ‘I’m really angry, I could hit him’. The emotions you would feel would be totally different than if you said ‘I’m feeling let down by you’. Try it yourself. It will feel different. If you suffer from anger problems, simply changing your words can change how you feel and act.

Now if you think about health, what words you use will again affect how you react. “I am a fat person” evokes a different feeling than “I am carrying a little bit of extra weight”. For some being fat will be painful, because it will involve loss of confidence and self esteem. But the thought of exercise and of going on a diet seems even more painful, so it’s easier to convince yourself, “hey I’m just carrying a little bit of extra weight. Besides I like my cakes and chocolate and exercise is so boring.” Isn’t this just using different words to control your mindset? Of course it is.

The outcome? Well in this case, the pain of being a little overweight is less than the pain of doing something about it, so nothing happens.  Can we change this? Of course, change your words and it will change the feelings that you associate both with being fat and doing something about it. Then it becomes a lot easier to make positive improvement.

What’s the point of this story, well so often at our clinic we have patients who maybe are heavier than they should be, who probably haven’t exercised for many years and don’t have a real commitment to change. The result? Well pain, stiffness, creaky joints and arthritis for a start. But the perceived pain of having to do something about it is worse than the physical pain, so patients use different words to justify their condition. That is, until the pain gets too much.

Sure, we can work on the physical pain, we have great skills for that, but the benefits are amplified when we change the mindset and get true commitment to get involved. How?

The first step is to get a real commitment for the need to change. This usually only comes about when you get to that point where you have had enough, where the pain of not changing is worse than the fear of change.

Once there, then it’s a matter of breaking the thoughts and associations you have that has kept you where you are and then replacing it with a new set of beliefs that make you really want to change.  This means that not changing means more pain and changing means moving away from that pain to something better.

If we go back to the overweight example, research has shown that in the majority of cases diets don’t work. The weight lost is back on within two years. That’s because dieting is just a temporary change of habit. Besides, dieting for most means moving towards pain. Not eating what you want, when you want and exercising is painful, right? But if you get the change of mindset, then the weight will come off and stay off.

Real improvements can come about if you want, all you need to do is to be shown how to change your mindset.

For more information about Nicky Snazell’s Pain Relief Clinic call 01889 881488 or visit www.painreliefclinic.co.uk